It’s actually NOT about the economy. Nor foreign policy. Not health care. Not taxes, not Black Lives Matter, not Antifa, not masks, not COVID-19, not social media, not even Hunter Biden’s scandals.

The 2020 presidential election is a choice between two different worldviews.

So contends Jack Hibbs, the founding pastor more than 30 years ago of Calvary Chapel Chino Hills in California, one of the largest Christian congregations in the nation.

In an interview with WND, he talked about the new documentary “After Trump: A Warning to America” in which Alveda King, a niece of Martin Luther King Jr., summarizes Donald Trump’s first term as “promises made and promises kept.”

Dr. Robert Jeffress warns the Democratic Party “is becoming a godless party.”

And Dennis Prager suggests that in America now, “more people fear the left than fear God.”

Hibbs told WND the U.S. is facing a “moment of telling.”

“Will the U.S. lean on, go back to, depend upon its spiritual roots as a nation. … Or will it surrender that biblical world view for a one-world type of government?” he asked. “That’s what’s really before us.”

He said the U.S., as a culture, has severed its spiritual ties to the God of the Bible. Abortion, same-sex marriage and transgenderism are just a few of the developments.

“Have we forgotten our roots? I fear we have. But I hope that there is a renewed interest. Call it a revival if you like, in our Judeo-Christian roots.”

He said the COVID-19 pandemic has helped teach people what’s important in life. People are realizing society itself does not provide answers, and they are lining up, hundreds at a time, as early as 6 a.m. to attend services at Calvary.

“I have been pastoring for 30 years, and never have seen people so hungry for the Bible,” he said. “There’s something going on.”

He said that during the COVID-19 pandemic, more than 300 home worship groups have spontaneously organized in the Calvary community. That, he hopes, will spill over into the election.

“Here is what I am making very clear locally, statewide and nationally on all our platforms,” he said. “This election is very, very simply over a biblical worldview. It is not based on any personality cult of the two candidates.”

The parties are “diametrically opposed,” as anyone who has read their platforms already knows, he said.

“Then the performance or policy achievements of the two candidates could not be any more divergent,” he said. “Joe Biden, 47 years in politics, has a scant record of achievement.”

“Trump, whether you like him or not is irrelevant,” but he has worked on “Israel, borders, prison reform, the First Step Act, and he’s pro-life, the biggest one for me,” Hibbs said. He also cited record-low unemployment, defeating ISIS, and opposing the “globalist agenda.”

Hibbs said that, for him, what Trump says is not what’s most important.

“Show me what he’s actually doing,” he said. “I watch voting records, and Trump has been profoundly consistent. What Donald Trump has done as my president is epic.”

The Biden-Harris ticket, on the other hand, is the “dedicated” progressive left.

“It’s the absence of God in their platform. They are not only pro-choice, to the point of partial birth abortion, Joe Biden supports that,” he said.

The triumvirate of House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer and presidential nominee Joe Biden advocate “encroachment upon our religious freedoms,” viewing biblical teaching and what pastors are preaching from the pulpit “as hate because it’s not culturally sensitive.”