University Of Minnesota Offers Lecture Teaching 12-Step AA-Type Program To Recover From Being White

University of Minnesota
Photo: University of Minnesota)

The University of Minnesota’s School of Social Work and Continuing Education Series recently hosted what they called a Special Webinar Series that was titled, “Deconstructing & Decentralizing White-ness in Practice: A Three-Part Series,” in which a lecture titled “Recovery from White Conditioning” taught white people how to use a “12-step” program similar to Alcoholics Anonymous to “recover and reclaim our full humanity.”

Therapist Cristina Combs, who created the program, spent “years of struggling to navigate the role and presence of whiteness in her personal, academic, and professional journeys,” the website for the series claims.

“Combs began the lecture by acknowledging that ‘I am on traditional Dakota land,’ the territory of a Native American tribe which settled in Minnesota,” The College Fix reported, in a lengthy article detailing the presentation.  “She also acknowledged ‘George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, and all of the other lives stolen from families and communities and our world due to police brutality and state-sanctioned violence.’”

After asking, “What comes to mind when you hear the term ‘white supremacy?”, Combs showed a slide with images of Ku Klux Klan members and white nationalists in Charlottesville, then replaced their images with one of herself, commenting, “When BIPOC (black, indigenous, people of color) activists would use the term ‘white supremacy’ to talk about the systems that needed to change and the work that white people needed to do, my instinct was to recoil. It felt like too hard or too raw of a word, and I didn’t like it. And I ultimately realized that that is my ego … Stepping into that tension and accepting my connection to white supremacy has been a freedom of sorts to show up in better alignment with my values and do the work for the rest of my life.”

In her preamble to the explanation of her 12-step program toward racial sobriety, Combs quoted feminist author Bell Hooks saying that “‘imperialist white supremacist capitalist patriarchy’ [is] the power structure underlying the social order.”

The 12 steps in the program:

Step 1: “We admitted that we had been socially conditioned by the ideology of white supremacy.”

Step 2: “We came to believe that we could embrace our ignorance as an invitation to learn.”

Step 3: “We develop support systems to keep us engaged in this work.”

Step 4: “We journeyed boldly inward, exploring and acknowledging ways in which white supremacist teachings have been integrated into our minds and spirits.”

Step 5: “We confessed our mistakes and failings to ourselves and others.”

Step 6: “We were entirely ready to deconstruct previous ways of knowing, as they have been developed through the lens of white supremacy.”

Step 7: “We humbly explored new ways of understanding…proactively seeking out new learning and reconstructing a more inclusive sense of reality.”

Step 8: “We committed ourselves to ongoing study of our racial biases, conscious or unconscious, and our maladaptive patterns of white supremacist thinking.”

Step 9: “We develop strategies to counteract our racial biases.”

Step 10: “We embraced the responsibility of focusing on our impact, more than our intentions, in interactions with people of color.”

Step 11: “We engage in daily practices of self-reflection.”

Step 12: “We committed ourselves to sharing this message with our white brothers, sisters, and siblings…in order to build a supportive recovery community and to encourage personal accountability within our culture.”


HD Editors Note: Why Is This News Biblically Relevant?

Ken Ham in his article “Responding to Racism—No Other Answer Than the Gospel” wrote on the Biblical response to racism and pointed out the error in falling into the social justice lie of “institutional racism“:

I’ve been speaking on the topic since the 1970s and have made it a vital component of our teaching at AiG. Now the true solution to racism is grounded in the history in the book of Genesis and the gospel. Because the solutions offered by so many in our culture are anti-biblical, we want believers to be equipped to respond in a way that honors the Lord and his Word.

And I’m not the only one saying this. Far from it! As just one example, Voddie Bauchum, who has spoken at many of our past conferences, was recently featured in an article on the website Christian Headlines. In the interview, he called attention to the centrality of the gospel in any biblical response to racism:

And it’s been interesting to watch scenes of white people, literally kneeling and bowing and genuflecting, in repentance over their sin of—of white privilege. Or, you know, bias. Or conscious bias. Or unconscious bias. Or whatever else . . .

Ultimately, “this religion [of social justice] is promising salvation, somewhere other than God . . . And unfortunately, there are many Christians who are sounding like they’re satisfied with this.” . . .

[Voddie] made a distinction between individual racism and institutional racism, calling them “two competing worldviews” . . .

“One worldview that says racism is individual. It’s an individual heart issue. And that’s the world where we deal with the individual heart issue, with the message of the gospel . . . But then there’s another worldview that says, no, no, no, no. Regardless of individual heart issue, this is a structural and institutional issue.”

As I’ve shared in the past, the gospel is the answer to racism. Salvation isn’t found anywhere but in Christ! And the sin of racism, ultimately, is a heart issue—it’s caused by sin in the hearts of men and women. A heart/spiritual problem requires a spiritual solution—and the only solution is the biblical truth that we’re all one race (which is confirmed by the science of genetics) and the gospel of Jesus Christ that is offered to all.

When Jesus’ disciples came to Him and asked, “What shall be the sign of thy coming, and of the end of the world?” Jesus explained to them that one of the signs that would precede His coming would be “nations” rising against “nations.”

The word “nations” found in this verse (Matthew 24:7) is from the Greek word “ethnos,” where we get our English word for “ethnicity.” Therefore, this verse can also be read that “ethnicity shall rise against ethnicity” in the last days.

Racism is not new. However, what does seem to be new to our generation is a fabricated racial division. Racism is a sin. Creating division and hatred is a sin (Prov. 6:16-19Luke 11:171 John 2:9). All of these things are deeply rooted in a rebellion against God, His Word, and His design.